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  • Innovation and Product Management Student : Creative Resume An Interactive Video Resume about Manish Abraham (http://www.manishabraham.com/) , who is presently studying Masters  in Innovation and product management at the University of Applied Sciences, Upper Austria. Scholastics ...
    Posted Feb 23, 2013, 5:47 AM by Manish Abraham
  • 10 Things You Can Learn From the Apple Store 10 Things You Can Learn From the Apple Store Carmine Gallo, has written a book called The Apple Experience: Secrets to Building Insanely Great Customer Loyalty. The Apple Store is ...
    Posted Feb 3, 2013, 5:10 AM by Manish Abraham
  • Robot Workers: Coexistence Is Possible Robot Workers: Coexistence Is PossibleThe robots are coming. Resistance is futile. From car factories to microprocessor plants to fulfillment warehouses, a single robot can now handle tasks that once ...
    Posted Feb 3, 2013, 5:12 AM by Manish Abraham
  • The thrilling potential of SixthSense technology Pranav Mistry is the inventor of SixthSense, a wearable device that enables new interactions between the real world and the world of data.Why Should You listen to the Video ...
    Posted Feb 3, 2013, 5:14 AM by Manish Abraham
  • What is 3d Laser Sintering? This video explains the 3d laser sintering :)      Connect With Manish Abraham on  
    Posted Oct 24, 2012, 4:56 PM by Manish Abraham
  • 6 Major Tech Innovations for 2012 6 Major Tech Innovations for 2012 These trends could make for huge opportunities or huge disruptions to business. Either way, they are ones to watch.  Several technology innovations are starting ...
    Posted Feb 3, 2013, 5:15 AM by Manish Abraham
  • What is Design Thinking?
    Posted Oct 19, 2012, 5:18 PM by Manish Abraham
  • What is Innovation?  Being master students it is really important we understand what is innovation. We often use the words "creativity" and "innovation" interchangeably but we should not. Creativity is about coming up ...
    Posted Oct 19, 2012, 5:14 PM by Manish Abraham
  • What Is Creativity? This Post is to explain what is creativity and the video is from a crash course in creativity from Stanford University.   
    Posted Oct 19, 2012, 5:12 PM by Manish Abraham
Showing posts 1 - 9 of 9. View more »


Innovation and Product Management Student : Creative Resume

posted Feb 23, 2013, 5:24 AM by Manish Abraham   [ updated Feb 23, 2013, 5:47 AM ]

In



An Interactive Video Resume about Manish Abraham (http://www.manishabraham.com/) , who is presently studying Masters 
in Innovation and product management at the University of Applied Sciences, Upper Austria.

Scholastics
1. University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, FH WELS: MSC in Engineering in Innovation and product management (Present).
2. Stanford University Technology Entrepreneurship and a Crash Course on creativity.
3. University of Northumbria at Newcastle Upon Tyne: BEng (Hons) Mobile Communication Engineering
4. Edexcel, UK: Higher Diploma in Electronics and Communication Engineering 
5. Open University: BA (Hons) Journalism and Mass Communication
He can offer you several years of technical & non-technical learning background, manage top-tier teams, have excellent project-management skills, an able and a quick learner, possess an exceptional eye for detail, hard work, ideation and enthusiasm additionally to what you see in the video. 

Website 

Resume in  PDF 

To get connected 
Skype User Name : Manish.abraham2


10 Things You Can Learn From the Apple Store

posted Dec 13, 2012, 3:18 PM by Manish Abraham   [ updated Feb 3, 2013, 5:10 AM ]

10 Things You Can Learn From the Apple Store

 Carmine Gallo, has written a book called The Apple Experience: Secrets to Building Insanely Great Customer Loyalty. The Apple Store is the most profitable retailer in America, generating an average of $5,600 per square foot and attracting more than 20,000 visitors a week.

In the decade since Steve Jobs and former head of retail, Ron Johnson, decided to reimagine the retail experience, the Apple Store not only reimagined and reinvented retail, it blew up the model entirely and started from scratch. In his research for The Apple Experience, Carmine discovered ten things that the Apple Store can teach any business in any industry to be more successful:

  1. 1. Stop selling stuff. When Steve Jobs first started the Apple Store he did not ask the question, “How will we grow our market share from 5 to 10 percent?” Instead he asked, “How do we enrich people’s lives?” Think about your vision. If you were to examine the business model for most brands and retailers and develop a vision around it, the vision would be to “sell more stuff.” A vision based on selling stuff isn’t very inspiring and leads to a very different experience than the Apple Retail Store created.

  2. Enrich lives. The vision behind the Apple Store is “enrich lives,” the first two words on a wallet-sized credo card employees are encouraged to carry. When you enrich lives magical things start to happen. For example, enriching lives convinced Apple to have a non-commissioned sales floor where employees feel comfortable spending as much time with a customer as the customer desires. Enriching lives led Apple to build play areas (the “family room”) where kids could see, touch and play on computers. Enriching lives led to the creation of a “Genius Bar” where trained experts are focused on “rebuilding relationships” as much as fixing problems.

  3. Hire for smiles. The soul of the Apple Store is in its people. They are hired, trained, motivated and taught to create magical and memorable moments for their customers. The Apple Store values a magnetic personality as much, if not more so, than technical proficiency. The Apple Store cares less about what you know than it cares about how much you love people.

  4. Celebrate diversity. Mohawks, tattoos, piercings are all acceptable among Apple Store employees. Apple hires people who reflect the diversity of their customers. Since they are more interested in how passionate you are, your hairstyle doesn’t matter. Early in the Apple Store history, they also learned that former teachers make the best salespeople because they ask a lot of questions. It’s not uncommon to find former teachers, engineers, and artists at an Apple Store. Apple doesn’t look for someone who fits a mold.

  5. Unleash inner genius. Teach your customers something they never knew they could do before, and they’ll reward you with their loyalty. For example, the Apple Store offers a unique program to help people understand and enjoy their computers: One to One. The $99 one-year membership program is available with the purchase of a Mac. Apple Store instructors called “creatives” offer personalized instruction inside the Apple Store. Customers can learn just about anything: basics about the Mac operating system; how to design a website; enjoying, sharing, and editing photos or movies; creating a presentation; and much more. The One to One program was created to help build customers for life. It was designed on the premise that the more you understand a product, the more you enjoy it, and the more likely you are to build a long-term relationship with the company. Instructors are trained to provide guidance and instruction, but also to inspire customers, giving them the tools to make them more creative than they ever imagined.

  6. Empower employees. I spent one hour talking to an Apple Store specialist about kids, golf, and my business. We spent about ten minutes talking about the product (a MacBook Air). I asked the employee whether he would be reprimanded for spending so much time with one customer. “Not at all,” he replied. “If you have a great experience, that’s all that matters.” Apple has a non-commissioned sales floor for a reason—employees are not pressured to “make a sale.” Instead they are empowered to do what they believe is the right thing to do.

  7. Sell the benefit. Apple Store specialists are taught to sell the benefit behind products and to customize those benefits for the customer. For example, I walked to the iPad table with my two young daughters and told the specialist I was considering my first iPad. In a brilliant move, the specialist focused on my two daughters, the ‘secondary’ customer who can influence a purchase. He let the girls play on separate devices. On one device he played the movie, Tangled, and on the other device he brought up a Disney Princess coloring app. My girls were thrilled and, in one memorable moment, my 6-year-old turned me to and said, “I love this store!” It’s easy to see why. Instead of touting “speeds and feeds,” the specialist taught us how the device could improve our lives.

  8. Follow the steps of service. The Apple Store teaches its employees to follow five steps in each and every interaction. These are called the Apple five steps of service. They are outlined by the acronym A-P-P-L-E. They are: Approach with a customized, warm greeting. Probe politely to understand the customer’s needs. Present a solution the customer can take home today. Listen for and address unresolved questions. End with a fond farewell and an invitation to return.

  9. Create multisensory experiences. The brain loves multi-sensory experiences. In other words, people enjoy being able to see, touch, and play with products. Walk into an Apple Store upon opening and you’ll see all the notebook computer screens perfectly positioned slightly beyond 90-degree angles. The position of the computer lets you see the screen (which is on and loaded with content) but forces you to touch the computer in order to adjust it. Every device in the store is working and connected to the Internet. Spend as much time as you’d like playing with the products—nobody will kick you out. Creatives who give One-to-One workshops do not touch the computer without asking for permission. They want you to do it. The sense of touch helps create an emotional connection with a product.

  10. Appeal to the buying brain. Clutter forces the brain to consume energy. Create uncluttered environments instead. The Apple Store is spacious, clean, well-lit, and uncluttered. Cables are hidden from view and no posters on placed on the iconic glass entrances. Computer screens are cleaned constantly. Keep the environment clean, open, and uncluttered.

Guy kawasaki


Robot Workers: Coexistence Is Possible

posted Dec 13, 2012, 3:10 PM by Manish Abraham

Robot Workers: Coexistence Is Possible

Robot Workers: Coexistence Is PossibleThe robots are coming. Resistance is futile. From car factories to microprocessor plants to fulfillment warehouses, a single robot can now handle tasks that once took hundreds of man-hours to complete. This relentless march of automation is causing economic upheaval. As time goes on, companies will become more productive and more efficient, but the amount of human labor required will decrease and the pay will be less. The sentient worker will be reduced to a relic of a simpler age.

This is what we’ve been told, anyway. To some economists, stubbornly high unemployment rates in the U.S. and Europe are at least partly attributable to the rise of machines. “There’s no question that in some high-profile industries, technology is displacing workers of all, or almost all, kinds,” wrote Paul Krugman in the New York Times on Dec. 9, adding that “many of the jobs being displaced are high-skill and high-wage.” Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Erik Brynjolfsson, co-author of Race Against the Machine, says: “Robots are becoming more capable and skilled, and people with the same sets of skills are not as much in demand.” According to this view, robots aren’t change agents. They’re destroyers of worlds.

Yet the robot revolution doesn’t have to cause panic. While robots can claim some technological superiority over humans, even the most sophisticated machines have limitations. Automation will inevitably displace jobs, but it’s already bringing fresh economic opportunities as well. The last two decades have shown how technology can create industries even as it turns whole cities into has-beens. The ratio of jobs created to jobs eliminated by robots and where all the new found wealth ultimately winds up are entirely dependent on how workers, businesses, and policymakers prepare for this new era.

History is punctuated with scares about automation, with industries rising and falling based on changing technologies. Toward the end of the 18th century, 90 percent of the U.S. population was involved in farming. Farmers now make up 2 percent of the domestic workforce because of innovations such as tractors and grain combines. Meanwhile, our modern economy includes people who make a living creating mobile apps, a profession that was inconceivable a generation ago.

More than any economy in the world, the U.S. has proven to be especially resilient in the face of massive technological change. Why should recent advances in robotics be any different?

One reason is the accelerating pace of change. “We have a growing mismatch between the speed of technological development and our ability to adapt to it,” says Brynjolfsson. Technological developments used to take time to work their way into society. The internal-combustion engine was developed in the latter half of the 19th century, but it displaced the horse as a means of transportation only some 50 years later. The World Wide Web, on the other hand, has upended industries in less than 20 years. Moore’s Law is faster than Otto’s cycle.

All that said, it’s too soon to write dirges for the humble human worker. In today’s workplace, there are still things that robots just can’t do. At Quiet Logistics, an order-fulfillment center for online retailers in Devens, Mass., 64 robots are used to move merchandise around the warehouse, but 330 humans are required to fold, package, and ship the products. Why not have robots do the whole thing? “People are really good at picking up things,” says Bruce Welty, Quiet Logistics’ chief executive officer. “It’s very difficult to get a robot to make the decisions required that a human makes to pick something out of a bin—particularly if there are many different things in that bin.”

Humans continue to have another advantage over robots: They remain a more flexible workforce. To handle this year’s holiday shopping season, Amazon.com (AMZN) hired 50,000 part-time workers. While seasonal, part-time labor is not something you can necessarily build an economy on, it’s worth noting that Amazon didn’t buy more robots, because you can’t hire a robot part-time (yet). What would additional robots do when demand receded? “Come January,” says Jim Tompkins, a supply-chain consultant, “all that automation’s going to be staring you in the face.”

This is the state of the robotic arts today: a point where humans and robots share labor, with robots handling the simple and repetitive and humans taking care of the complex and dynamic. Some robotics designers and engineers would like this to be a blueprint for the future, where increased automation does not necessarily displace human beings. Rodney Brooks, a former MIT robotics professor, is an optimist. To Brooks, who is also founder and chairman of robot maker Rethink Robotics, these machines are going to help workers, not compete with them. He points out that personal computers didn’t get rid of office workers, they changed the jobs people did. When it comes to robots, “it’s not a one-for-one replacement,” he says. “People are so much better at certain things.”

But robots are still in their relative infancy. As faster processors and improved sensors enhance robots’ capabilities, it’s highly possible that the peaceful coexistence between man and machine may evolve into something more competitive. “In manufacturing, there’s already a ton of innovation going on,” says Brynjolfsson. Economists like him fear that as robots get smarter, the gross domestic product will expand at a healthy clip, but that positive data would mask reduced employment and lower wages. “Can GDP continue to grow? Of course it can,” says MIT economist Frank Levy. “The question is: Can everyone benefit?”

Extrapolate this further, and the role robots play in our economy and our lives begins to provoke fundamental questions about the nature of work. We have organized our economic system around the idea that income is derived from labor. But what happens when labor is not just transferred from one group of people to another (outsourcing) but to machines?

History has never shown that a life of idle hedonism brings out the best in human beings. We excel when we are creative and productive. To ensure that continues to be the case, we can’t ignore or prevent the growth of automation, but we can bring our considerable talents to bear on determining what the future of work will look like. For the U.S., that will require innovation and entrepreneurship, but also policies that foster those things—such as an immigration policy that attracts and retains high-skilled newcomers who can help build job-creating industries, and a corporate tax rate that encourages investment in domestic opportunities and not offshore tax-haven chicanery. Critically, more of the wealth created by productivity gains needs to be channeled into a stronger system of education and training.

If the robot threat proves overblown and automation is not as transformative as is predicted or feared, then none of those efforts will have been in vain—they are answers not just to the threat of robots, but also to many other issues that challenge U.S. economic potential. “Our economy has a lot of problems,” says Northwestern University economist Robert Gordon. “If you’re looking for new problems, it’s not robots.” It makes more sense to adapt to robots’ taking our old jobs than to fight against it. Who knows? Once we figure out how to work with robots, we might even learn to love them.

By Sam Grobart 

The thrilling potential of SixthSense technology

posted Oct 24, 2012, 3:22 PM by Manish Abraham   [ updated Feb 3, 2013, 5:14 AM ]


Pranav Mistry is the inventor of SixthSense, a wearable device that enables new interactions between the real world and the world of data.



Why Should You listen to the Video ?
Pranav Mistry is a PhD student in the Fluid Interfaces Group at MIT's Media lab. Before his studies at MIT, he worked with Microsoft as a UX researcher; he's a graduate of IIT. Mistry is passionate about integrating the digital informational experience with our real-world interactions.
Some previous projects from Mistry's work at MIT includes intelligent sticky notes, Quickies, that can be searched and can send reminders; a pen that draws in 3D; and TaPuMa, a tangible public map that can act as Google of physical world. His research interests also include Gestural and Tangible Interaction, Ubiquitous Computing, AI, Machine Vision, Collective Intelligence and Robotics.

What is 3d Laser Sintering?

posted Oct 20, 2012, 6:06 AM by Manish Abraham   [ updated Oct 24, 2012, 4:56 PM ]

This video explains the 3d laser sintering :)

3d Laser sintering

  

   Connect With Manish Abraham on
 

6 Major Tech Innovations for 2012

posted Oct 20, 2012, 5:53 AM by Manish Abraham   [ updated Feb 3, 2013, 5:15 AM ]

6 Major Tech Innovations for 2012

These trends could make for huge opportunities or huge disruptions to business. Either way, they are ones to watch.

 Several technology innovations are starting to show promise. Whether these trends will force you to change how you do business, or present you with entirely new opportunities depends on how willing you are to be an early adopter and take risks. You'll have to find room in your IT budget for these things, too. Whatever you do, keep these innovations on your radar:

1. Predictive technology

Several companies have started talking about their research into predictive tech. The idea is that, as computers become smarter, they can analyze historical data to make predictions. For example, Ford is using technology from Google to develop a navigation system that predicts, based on your previous routes, where you want to go at a specific time of the day. For small business, predictive tech could help in small ways: Your printer might forecast how much paper you will need next month, or help you arrange a better utility contract for heating based on trends form the past few years.

2. HTML5

There has been buzz about HTML5 now for the past few years. The new version of HTML provides a richer framework for videos and interactive content. Steve Jobs claimed it was a better approach to dealing with this rich content than Adobe Flash. One sign that HTML5 may finally replace Flash comes from the automotive world. In the upcoming Cadillac XTS sedan, the dashboard interface uses HTML5 so developers can make new apps without being confined to a specific code base.

3. High resolution displays

The Apple iPad 3 is the first sign that mobile devices are going ultra-high-res. The iPad 3 has a 2048 x 1536 screen that looks super-sharp for videos, e-books, and apps. But the iPad 3 is not the only device to offer much higher resolution. The Samsung Series 9 desktop display uses 2560 x 1440 pixels for a screen that looks much more sharp than most monitors.

4. Social analytics

Sprout Social, a tool that helps you understand your social graph: how well you are connecting with others, your reputation, your follower stats. What I’m seeing lately is an uptick in “aggregators of aggregators”—tools like this moment that takes the data obtained from Google Analytics, Facebook Insights, and others, and shows you how your company is doing on campaigns. As with any business endeavor, these super-aggregators are trying to get to the bottom line to understand whether social marketing efforts are paying off—or leading you nowhere.

5. Speech for business

One of the great features of Apple's Siri is its ability to understand context. You can add a reminder that tells your wife when you leave work. When you do, Siri sends the reminder based  on your location. Lately, speech tech has shown signs of improving even more. Natural language searches will become commonplace in a few years—you will be able to walk into a conference room and say “tell everyone the meeting is cancelled” and the speech system will know what you mean and send the message.

6. Business-ready storage

Cloud storage has changed how Big Business operates—in some cases, larger companies are ditching their data centers altogether. But small companies do not even have data centers. Some of the choices for storage are making a huge impact—Dropbox is more popular than ever. But a new service called Huddle provides better reporting, security, and team accounts that is a better choice for business.
 
 
Credits

What is Design Thinking?

posted Oct 19, 2012, 5:04 PM by Manish Abraham   [ updated Oct 19, 2012, 5:18 PM ]

Design Thinking





What is Innovation?

posted Oct 19, 2012, 5:00 PM by Manish Abraham   [ updated Oct 19, 2012, 5:14 PM ]

 Being master students it is really important we understand what is innovation. We often use the words "creativity" and "innovation" interchangeably but we should not. Creativity is about coming up with ideas while innovation is about "bringing ideas to life." While individuals may display creativity, innovation occurs in the organizational context only, by bringing creative ideas to life.

Innovation is linked to performance and growth through improvements in efficiency, productivity, quality, competitive positioning and market share. It typically adds value by changing old organizational forms and practices. Organizations that do not innovate effectively may be destroyed by those who do.

A 2007 Booz Allen study illustrated that the one key characteristic of successful innovators is that they had a rigorous process for managing innovation including "a disciplined, stage-by-stage approval process combined with regular measurements of every critical factor, from time and money spent.to the success of new products and services in the market."

Innovation by businesses is achieved in many ways; through formal research and development for "breakthrough innovations" as well as through less formal on-the-job modifications of practice-such as through exchange, personal experience and by many other routes. Regardless, innovations do not just happen-they are a team effort. Most successful innovation occurs at the boundaries of organizations and industries where the problems and needs of users and the potential of technologies are linked together in a creative and collaborative process that challenges both.

What Is Creativity?

posted Mar 19, 2012, 9:34 AM by Manish Abraham   [ updated Oct 19, 2012, 5:12 PM ]

This Post is to explain what is creativity and the video is from a crash course in creativity from Stanford University. 
  



Creativity

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